Academic Catalog

Philosophy (3600)

3600:101. Introduction to Philosophy. (3 Credits)

Introduction to philosophic problems and attitudes through acquaintance with thoughts on some leading thinkers of Western tradition.

3600:120. Introduction to Ethics. (3 Credits)

Introduction to problems of moral conduct through readings from the tradition and class discussions; nature of "good," "right," "ought" and "freedom".

3600:125. Theory & Evidence. (3 Credits)

An investigation of the concept of evidence and the criteria for the evaluation of theories in various areas of study including the natural sciences, the social sciences and philosophy. The role of scientific information in the formation and justification of value judgments.

3600:150. Critical Thinking. (3 Credits)

Examination of good and bad reasoning patterns. Topics may include rational and persuasive arguments, deductive and inductive inference, causal and basic statistical inference, logical fallacies, and moral arguments.

3600:170. Introduction to Logic. (3 Credits)

Introduction to logic and critical thinking. Includes such topics as meaning, informal fallacies, propositional logic, predicate and syllogistic logic and nature of induction.

3600:211. History of Ancient Philosophy. (3 Credits)

History and development of ancient Greek philosophy including Presocratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and Hellenistic philosophers. Readings of primary sources in translation.

3600:312. History of Medieval Philosophy. (3 Credits)

History of Western philosophy from end of Roman Empire to Renaissance. Major philosophers studied include St. Augustine, St. Anselm, Peter Abelard, St. Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus and William of Ockham. Readings from primary sources.

3600:313. History of Modern Philosophy. (3 Credits)

Analysis of major philosophical issues of 17th and 18th Centuries from Descartes through Kant. Readings of primary sources in translation.

3600:323. Advanced Topics in Ethics. (3 Credits)

(May be repeated with change of topic for a total of nine credits). An examination of selected topics in applied ethics and ethical theory, such as the ethics of cloning, evolutionary ethics, history of ethics and ethical issues from the Human Genome Project. Specific topics will be announced in the course schedule.

3600:324. Social & Political Philosophy. (3 Credits)

An examination of the normative justification of social and political institutions and practices. Analysis of concepts such as rights, justice, equality, and political obligation from historical as well as contemporary points of view. Application to particular social issues covered.

3600:327. Law and Morality. (3 Credits)

Nature of law examined from the perspective of the law's alleged obligation to be ethical and promote justice.

3600:329. Philosophies of International Law. (3 Credits)

Inquiry into the theories of utility of international law and the philosophical controversies surround them, e.g., international legal norms vs. international relations.

3600:331. Philosophy of Religion. (3 Credits)

Discussion and analysis of problems of theology, nature of religious experience, God's nature, existence, immortality, sin, faith, reason, holy revelation, and redemption.

3600:333. Philosophy of Science and Religion. (3 Credits)

Survey of conflict, independence, and integration models of science and religion. Topics include: origin and nature of the universe, life, mind, value, meaning, science, religion.

3600:340. Eastern Philosophy. (3 Credits)

Examination and evaluation of philosophical traditions from India, China and Japan, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism.

3600:350. Philosophy of Art. (3 Credits)

An examination of theories of the nature of art and the grounds of aesthetic evaluation. Analysis of such concepts as representation, form, content, expression, institution, convention, meaning and truth as they apply in the context of the arts.

3600:361. Biomedical Ethics. (3 Credits)

The identification, analysis and evaluation of ethical issues arising most critically in the biomedical setting, e.g., abortion, termination of treatment, definition of death, IVF, AIDS.

3600:362. Business Ethics. (3 Credits)

Basic moral theories, moral principles, and the decision- making process applied to issues in business.

3600:363. Police Ethics. (3 Credits)

Basic moral concepts and their application to the criminal justice system. Concerned with such issues as punishment, the use of force, and conflict resolution.

3600:364. Computer Ethics. (3 Credits)

A critical examination of ethical issues arising in connection with computers and information technology, e.g., computer hacking, electronic privacy, and the regulation of Internet content.

3600:365. Environmental Ethics. (3 Credits)

Examination of the moral relationships among human beings, other species, and their shared environment. Ethical aspects of agriculture, global warming, extinction, and wilderness.

3600:371. Philosophy of Mind. (3 Credits)

Nature of mind and the relationship between mind and body. Specific topics such as the limits of human reason, personal identity, the role of human thought in action and whether machines can think are also considered.

3600:392. Internship in Philosophy. (1-3 Credits)

Prerequisite: Minimum cumulative Grade Point Average of 2.7 or greater. Placement in appropriate public or private sector organization. Written assignments required. May repeat for maximum 6 credits.

3600:411. Plato. (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3600:211 with a grade of C or higher. Detailed study of the origin and development of Plato's theory of forms and the related theories of knowledge, ethics and politics.

3600:414. Aquinas. (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: Completion of one course in philosophy with a grade of "C" or higher. An in depth examination of the philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas covering his contributions in metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, political theory, and philosophical theology.

3600:415. Augustine. (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: Completion of one course in philosophy with a grade of "C" or higher. An in depth examination of the philosophy of St. Augustine covering his contributions in metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, political theory, and philosophical theology.

3600:418. 20th Century Analytic Philosophy. (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: Completion of one course in philosophy with a grade of "C" or higher. Study of ideal and ordinary language movements in 20th century British and American philosophy. Deals with such figures as Russell, Carnap, Ayer, Moore, Wittgenstein, Ryle and Austen.

3600:421. Philosophy of Law. (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: Completion of one course in philosophy with a grade of "C" or higher. Identification and critical evaluation of classic and contemporary theories and assumptions of law, including legal reasoning, justice, natural law, punishment, etc.

3600:424. Existentialism. (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: Completion of one course in philosophy with a grade of C or higher, or permission of instructor. In-depth inquiry into the thought of Kierkegaard, Jaspers, Heidegger, Sartre, Tillich and other existentialists with their concern for the human condition.

3600:426. Phenomenology. (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: Completion of one course in philosophy with a grade of C or higher, or permission. Inquiry into methodology of Husserl and Heidegger and their influence upon Western European and American thought.

3600:432. Aristotle. (3 Credits)

Prerequisites: 3600:211 with a grade of C or higher. Detailed study of Aristotle's metaphysics, philosophy of nature, philosophy of mankind and ethics.

3600:434. Kant. (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3600:313 with a grade of C or higher. Study of Kantian system of thought and its relation to history of philosophy. Includes thorough investigation of one or more of Kant's philosophic works.

3600:455. Philosophy of Feminism. (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: One course in philosophy with a grade of C or better, or permission of instructor. Introduction to feminist critiques of, and alternatives to, traditional western philosophy, including topics in ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, and religion.

3600:461. Neuroethics. (3 Credits)

Prerequisites: [3600:120 or 3600:361] with a grade of "C" or higher. Discussion and evaluation of contemporary theories of moral agency arising from developments in neuroscience.

3600:462. Theory of Knowledge. (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: Completion of one course in philosophy with a grade of "C" or higher. Examination of nature of knowledge; theories of perception, conception and truth, problem of induction and relation of language to knowledge.

3600:464. Philosophy of Science. (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: Completion of one course in philosophy with a grade of "C" or higher. Nature of scientific inquiry, types of explanation, laws and causality, theoretical concepts and reality. Also considers critics of hypothetical-deductive view of science, e.g., Hanson and Kuhn.

3600:471. Metaphysics. (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: Completion of one course in philosophy with a grade of "C" or higher. Theories about ultimate nature and ultimate explanation of reality. Uses readings from classical and contemporary sources.

3600:480. Seminar in Philosophy. (3 Credits)

(May be repeated, for additional credit, with change of topic). Prerequisite: Completion of one course in philosophy with a grade of "C" or higher. Varying philosophical topics not covered in regular course offerings.

3600:481. Philosophy of Language. (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: Completion of one course in philosophy with a grade of C or higher, or permission of instructor. Contemporary philosophies about nature of language and its relation to reality and human thinking. Includes discussion of views of linguists such as Chomsky.

3600:490. Senior Honors Project in Philosophy. (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: Senior standing in Honors Program or senior honors standing as Philosophy major, and permission of Philosophy Department Honors Preceptor. Research leading to completion of senior honors thesis involving original work under faculty supervision.

3600:497. Individual Study in Philosophy. (1-3 Credits)

(May be repeated for a total of six credits) Prerequisites: 3600:101, 3600:120, 3600:170, 3600:211, 3600:312, and 3600:313. Directed independent study of philosopher, philosophy or philosophical problem under guidance of selected faculty member. Subject matter determined by selected faculty member in consultation with student. Graduate credit requires significant additional work which may include additional research paper.